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PBS
Aug 19, 2009 5:00pm EDT
airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were deployed to afghanistan in the fall of 2001 and iraq in the spring of 2003. and hundreds of billions of dollars have been spent but all these years later neither country tonight seems especially secure. we'll take y
PBS
Aug 9, 2009 7:00am EDT
the environmental movement dropped u.s. population stabilization as one of its goals. [ ♪music ] >> bonnie: hello, i'm bonnie erbÉ. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. in the 1970s, u.s. population and the environment were widely and publicly linked in popular culture and by the environmental movement. but today the environmental movement eschews the population issue. in the first of a three-part series, we look at why and how this happened. organizers of the first earth day in 1970 called u.s. population stabilization critical to restoring the environment. the nationwide celebration produced a particular groundswell that spurred congress and the nixon, ford and carter administrations to enact a host of sweeping environmental laws including president nixon's national environmental policy act, often referred to as the nation's environmental magna carta. >> i mean, they really did a phenomenal job of studying it. it was a very scholarly approach. they had economists, environmentalists, everybody else, trying to look at the whole effect of
PBS
Aug 18, 2009 5:00pm EDT
to help us prevent any incidents happening. >> reporter: never before would you see afghan police patrolling in american humvees. authorities are confident the taliban won't be able to stop voters from heading to polling station. >> in case something happened, those will be i.d.s. which are difficult. or some sporadic shooting from outside of the city like from the districts but also we want to minimize those when we send forces to the district as well. >> reporter: the facr naeshing districts of kandahar city have a strong taliban presence and thursday's voting day will show just how tight the noose is around this capital. ze ina kandahar. >>> next door in helmand province offensive by american and british troops has been under way for a while. one immediate goal is to push back the taliban so that more people can vote thursday but as lindsay hill som, after decades of warfare. remains skeptical about the motives the foreign troops and fearful of their own safety. >> reporter: coming into land in what the british call a liberated area. seized from the taliban in operation princes
PBS
Aug 6, 2009 6:00pm EDT
's getting cash for clunkers and what are they buying; and a science story about using forensic testing to determine the age of ivory tusks. major funding for the newshour with jim lehrer is provided by: >> what the world needs now is energy. the energy to get the economy humming again. the energy to tackle challenges like climate change. what is that energy came from an energy company? everyday, chevron invests $62 million in people, in ideas-- seeking, teaching, building. fueling growth around the world to move us all ahead. this is the power of human energy. chevron. intel. supporting math and science education for tomorrow's innovators. the atlantic philanthropies. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. senate confirmed sonia sotomayor to the nation's highest court today. the federal appeals judge will now become the first hispanic justice and the third woman to sit on the unite
PBS
Aug 31, 2009 5:00pm EDT
who supported us. we now need to fight and work hard. >> hungry for change, the japanese turned out in droves. 70% of eligible voters cast a ballot. >> we need change to break the current situation in japan, just like the united states, we need change. >> in tokyo, only heavy rains from a typhoon stopped more people from making it to a polling booth. within minutes of the poll's closing, it was clear that the opposition had swept to power in a landslide. for the prime minister taro aso, the election put an end to an 11-month reign flanked by verbal gaffes and public paralysis. >> i feel it was my fate to take this election loss. i accept it. >> japan was hit by the perfect economic and political storm. >> people suffering unemployment at a record high. so that was a big factor. the other factor was the opposition had become electable after being quite symbolic through the 1990s. >> the son of a foreign minister and e grandson of a prime minister, yukio hatoyama comes from a political family often called the kennedys of japan. he's promising revolutionary change including free high s
PBS
Aug 21, 2009 5:00pm EDT
of the lockerbie bombing were american and on u.s. television last night the condemnation of this prisoner release was clear, before al megrahi even arrived home the state department it announced it had put pressure on the libyan government. >> i think obviously in light of the release, we have had a number of conversations with the government of libya. obviously, he will move back to libya, and we certainly believe that as a convicted criminal, he's not entitled to a hero's welcome. >> reporter: diplomat relations between libya and the u.s. which had been improving could be threatened by these scenes. this year is the 40th anniversary of the al fatah revolution in libya and colonel gadhafi is clearly using al megrahi return as a propaganda coupe despite the fact that this man is a convicted murderer who is termally ill and expected to die within three months. >> that was james blake of itn reporting. >>> the british aren't just talking about how unhappy they are about the way the libyans handled ali al megrahi's return home. they may be prepared to do something about it. prince andrew, the duke o
PBS
Aug 13, 2009 12:00am EDT
>>> tonight on "worldfocus" -- >>> u.s. marines meet heavy resistance as they try to gain control of a strategic taliban-held town in southern afghanistan. could this be a sign of battles to come? >>> in taiwan, rescuers find more than a thousand people alive in the area around three villages buried beneath mudslides triggered by last weekends typhoon. >>> we continue to look at the impact of climate change on remote lands. tonight, we're back in nepal to see how a centuries old way of life is being threatened. where did the glaciers go? >>> and mexico's ongoing against drug cartels was a topic at this weeks north america summit. tonight our "signature story" focuses on one of the painful side effects of that fight. the disappeared. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here is what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> united states marines went on the offensive today. launching a major new attack on a taliban stronghold in the south of that country. hundr
PBS
Aug 10, 2009 6:00pm EDT
. fueling growth around the world to move us all ahead. this is the power of human energy. chevron. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: iraq was hit with a new wave of bombings today that killed at least 48 people. more than 250 others were wounded. the attacks were the latest to target shiites, and they raised fears that widespread sectarian violence will erupt again. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of independent television news. >> coming iraq and the region. about 1507 wounded. the shiite village, a similar attack on local shiites only last friday. the -- in northern iraq a full day of attacks. in baghdad bombings today, in areas where shiites were. the past earlier two explosions. >> gathering here, what did people do to deserve this. >> reporter: the pri
PBS
Aug 5, 2009 7:00pm EDT
the u.s. economy lost 371,000 jobs last month. to keep up with population growth, economists figure the u.s. needs to create 130,000 jobs a month. in a recovery, the u.s. should create something like 300,000 to 400,000 a month, enough to begin reducing unemployment significantly. that means the country won't recover the jobs lost to this recession until somewhere around the year 2014 at the earliest. economist dean baker says it won't be easy to replace the jobs lost because the recession has slammed housing and auto manufacturing, two sectors that usually drive the recovery in hiring. >> in the case of residential construction, we have enormous over-capacity. it's very difficult to imagine any significant increase in employment in that sector for years to come. in the case of autos, we can see increased demand, we probably will see increased demand, but a lot of that demand is going to be for foreign cars right now. >> reporter: of course, the economy will eventually create enough jobs to make up for those lost in the great recession. but those jobs may also be in different industr
PBS
Aug 18, 2009 5:30pm EDT
the seller was offering it to us. >> the taliban is trying hard to derail the -- a suicide bomber killed 10, including two u.s. workers. the chief spokesman is arrested. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you -- farewell sunshine. south korea mourns the death of the president who championed a reconciliation with the north. and he never cooks at home, but he is big on breakfast tv. a celebrity chef. hello to you. thousands of voting cards offered for thousands of dollars in bribes to buy votes. the bbc has uncovered evidence of fraud and corruption. this in the run-up to the election in afghanistan. the afghan election commission has denied that voting cards are being sold and said in any case that can only be used for the rightful owners. questions are being asked how credible the poll can be. we have this report. >> the city is full of rumors about this election -- fraud, corruption, and backroom deals with notorious war lords. we were given a tipoff the voting cards were being sold in cobble -- kabul. an afghan posed as a buy
PBS
Aug 6, 2009 5:00pm EDT
>>> tonight on "worldfocus" "worldfocus" "worldfocus" -- >> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton pledges to expand america's support for somalia's weak interim government. >>> americans may be busy trading their clunkers for new cars. in the west african nation of benin, we show you the booming business that brings new life to old automobiles. >>> spy in the sky. israel launches a new kind of surveillance play that can go from backpack to front lines in just minutes. >>> and pity poor latvia. crushed by the economic downturn, it's snoufring a new problem, british bachelors gone wild. >>> good evening, i'm martin savid savidge. it's been quite a week for clinton family, with bill clinton capturing headlines in north korea the last two days. today it was hillary clinton in africa. the secretary of state was talking tough about islamic extremists in somalia and offering to expand and extend american support to that very tenuous government in that country. she said the militants there see somalia as a future haven for global terrorism. in tonight's lead focus, we look at clinton's vi
PBS
Aug 5, 2009 5:00pm EDT
, and when we walked through the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. >> donald kirk is a correspondent for the christian science monitor. he's spent the past 12 years based in south korea. >> caller: i think it's a big deal in the sense that it says korean relations. the fact that kim jong-il was glad to receive a high-profile american visitor in the form of bill clinton was certainly interesting. there's hope that perhaps it'll be possible to resume negotiations on one level or another. >> outside of the united states, reaction was mixed. in nairobi at a conference of african leaders, secretary of state hillary clinton told reporters, she was excited by the news. nonetheless, she reiterated america's hard line regarding north korea's nuclear program. >> they have a choice. they can continue to follow a path that is filled with provocative actions, or they can decide to renew their discussions. >> in south korea, reaction to thnews of the release of lee and ling was noticeably subdued. north korea currently detained several hundred south koreans. some of whom acciden
PBS
Aug 24, 2009 7:00pm EDT
are perking up. we look at whether that rising tide will help lift the u.s. economy. >> susie: prospects for recovery are definitely lifting oil prices. crude continued its march higher on hopes a recovery will bring with it a big boost in demand. >> paul: "cash for clunkers" heads to history's scrap heap but dealers are getting a little extra time to cross their "t's" and dot their "i's". so what's next for the u.s. auto industry? coming up, some answers from a noted analyst. >> susie: this recruiter is trying to fill 300 positions but he's swamped with thousands of resumes. tonight, standing out in a crowded field of applicants. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> susie: and i'm susie gharib. this is nightly business report for monday, august 24. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening everyone. oil prices closed at a new high for the year: $74.37 a barrel. in new york trading october crude futures rose 48 cents to settle just shy of $75. prices have doubled sinc
PBS
Aug 27, 2009 5:30pm EDT
minister tells us the iraqi army, police were partly responsible. >> the iraqi security forces should have done a better job because there were clear instructions. no trucks should move in certain parts of baghdad. >> do you think there is more to come? >> i think there is more to come unless the government shows it is up to this challenge and take some measures. >> it is fear corruption has left iraq's security forces full of holes. this businessman told us he often pays brides at police checkpoints to get his trucks through quickly -- paid bribes at police checkpoints to get his truck through quickly. >> the police let them go without searching them, which is a big mistake. this is common all over the country, not just baghdad. >> bombs could have been hidden under all that equipment? >> yes. the problem is the police do not live up to their responsibilities. >> we have heard countless other examples. i driver who takes four separate bribes -- a a driver who takes four separate bribes. and man who had money and jewelry stolen when iraqi troops did a search operation. it never happened he
PBS
Aug 29, 2009 12:00am EDT
a stormy meeting between hamid karzai and the u.s. special envoy. >>> in japan unemployment sores on the eve of national elections there. a youth movement sweeping the country and the party that has ruled japan for decades may be on the way out. >>> in sub-saharan africa, malaria still kills more than a million people a year. now comes hope of a vaccine that could save countless lives. >>> and sailing solo. tonight, a look at two teens and their quest to go arou world alone. in britain, it's considered a challenge. in holland, it could be a case of child abuse. >> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- >> major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> we are going to start tonight with afghanist, where the death of a u.s. soldier today made this the deadliest month of the eight-ye
PBS
Aug 30, 2009 6:30am EDT
endowment >> abernethy: welcome. i'm bob abernethy. good to have you with us. religious leaders across the spectrum were among those offering tributes after the death of senator edward kennedy this week. several faith groups praised his support for healthcare reform as a moral issue and his work on poverty, immigration and civil rights. kennedy was a roman catholic who advocated strict separation of church and state. he sometimes took stands that conflicted with the teachings of his church, such as his support for abortion rights. but he also sided with the church on many social justice issues. boston cardinal sean o'malley issued a statement saying kennedy was quote "often a champion for the poor, the less fortunate and those seeking a better life." the world's more than one- billion muslims are celebrating their holy month of ramadan. it's a time of day time fasting and special prayers. in many parts of the world, muslims are conducting special ramadan charity projects. president obama recorded a video message wishing muslims well during this sacred time. >> fasting is a concept shar
PBS
Aug 8, 2009 12:00am EDT
killed by a u.s. missile strike. will it bring an end to his campaign of violence? >>> we mark the anniversary of the brief but brutal war between russia and georgia that left hundreds dead. tonight we look at the legacy of anger that remains. >>> how they see it. tonight, we get the british take on an american investment bank, goldman sachs. its huge profits and big bonuses in spite of a sputtering economy have some wonderinabout government connections. >>> and hell on earth. tonight, we take you to a sulfur mine in java where the workers get a good wage, but may be paying with their health. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here is what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> for months, he was the top target of the cia and pakistan's military, baitullah mehsud, the head of the taliban in pakistan. a notorious militant commander who controlled a wide area of pakistan's northwest. a man whose organization killed hundreds of security forces and civil
PBS
Aug 27, 2009 12:00am EDT
>>> tonight on "worldfocus" -- >>> israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and u.s. special envoy george mitchel meet to try to solve the thorny issue of jewish settlements in the west bank. can they find common ground? >>> from those trying to broker a peace to stockbrokers hoping to cash in on it. tonight, we take you to the palestinian stock exchange. it may be one of the world's smallest but the dreams are big. >>> in the wake of the world's economic meltdown, we have a special "how they see it" report from britain's itn which questions one of the basic principals of american economics. >>> and the world pays tribute to the passing of senator edward kennedy. >> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> the quest for peace in the midd
PBS
Aug 13, 2009 7:00pm EDT
. >> you have to be really smart about how you use your money nowadays, so coming here, it's a better way to save money. >> suzanne: that's jennifer, and value is why she and millions of other freshman are staying close to home for college this fall. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> suzanne: and i'm suzanne pratt. susie gharib is off tonight. this is "nightly business report" for thursday, august 13. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suzanne: good evening, everyone. today is the deadline for seven large companies to submit their executive compensation plans to the obama administration's pay czar. tomorrow, kenneth feinberg will begin reviewing the pay plans for the firms still on government life support, including citigroup and g.m. feinberg has 60 days to accept or reject the proposals. joining me now with his thoughts on the hot topic of executive compensation is charles elson. he is a professor at the university of delaware and director of the weinberg center for corporate
PBS
Aug 14, 2009 7:00pm EDT
in the u.s. surpassing credit card transactions for the first time ever. but as stephanie dhue reports, for consumers, the trend has its pluses and minuses. >> reporter: josh clark is among the increasing number of americans who are choosing debit over credit. he made the switch three months ago, after maxing out his credit card while starting a designer jean business. >> i realized if i put something on my credit card, i'm going to be paying interest on it until i can fully repay it. >> reporter: tight credit is also encouraging more debit card use. and consumers are using it to manage their money. clark says it helps him control spending. >> i check my bank account more frequently than i check my credit card account, so i'm more in tune with how much money i have to spend. >> reporter: as debit card use surpasses credit cards that presents new challenges for both consumers and regulators. debit cards come with fewer built-in protections. consumer advocate ed mierzwinski warns in the case of a lost or stolen card number, the debit card holder can be on the hook for much more than if a
PBS
Aug 17, 2009 7:00pm EDT
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> paul: u.s. stocks take it on the chin with the dow posting its biggest drop in over a month, down 2%. that has some wondering if the summer rally's over or just taking a breather. >> jeff: today's selling started in asia and spread around the globe, despite japan's emergence from recession. global markets strategist stu schweitzer joins us for a look at the big picture. >> just to be on the safe side we decided not to kill any engines or shred any cars until the government funds the program. and pays for it. >> paul: sam mansouri's among thousands of car dealers waiting on a "cash for clunkers" payday and wondering what's next for the industry. >> jeff: then, shares of lowe's get nailed, falling 10% as the home improvement retailer's latest earnings miss the mark. and it pulls back on expansion plans. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> jeff: and i'm jeff yastine. susie gharib is off tonight. this is "nightly business report" for monday, august 17. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pb
PBS
Aug 3, 2009 6:00pm EDT
, teaching, building. fueling growth around the world to move us all ahead. this is the power of human energy. chevron. intel. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: iran's rulers faced down new evidence of discontent today, as a mass trial of opposition figures got under way. the accused were arrested in the aftermath of june's disputed presidential election. the declared winner of that vote, president mahmoud ahmadinejad, was formally endorsed today by iran's supreme leader. margaret warner has our lead story. >> warner: the trial of 100 people accused of post-election violence began on saturday in tehran. but today, the wife of one, former vice president mohammad abtahi, charged his televised+ confession had been coerced. abtahi alleged opposition leaders conspired to misrepresent the
PBS
Aug 1, 2009 12:00am EDT
possible, in part, by the follow funders -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> for u.s. troops and iraqi civilians, this has been one of the least, that's right, least deadly months since the war in iraq began six years ago. in fact, a senior u.s. military officer has broken ranks with its superiors and president obama saying it's time for the united states to declare victory iraq and go home. but then there are days like today, when a series of bombs exploded near five shiite mosques in baghdad, killing at least 29 people. and shattering the perception at least for now that iraq is a much safer place than it used to be. in tonight's "lead focus," the latest violence in iraq, what it says about security and the american mission as it winds down. >> the deadliest of today's attacks took place in the northern baghdad neighborhood of al shaab. according to iraqi officials at least 24 people were killed and 17 wounded in the explosion of a car bomb near a shiite mosque. worshipers had gathered at the mosque for friday prayers. the scene outside spoke to the carnage. prayer rugs wer
PBS
Aug 3, 2009 5:30pm EDT
the taliban cannot militarily defeat us. we, though, can defeat ourselves. in other words, the military suggesting this is going to be a var long haul with no guarantees -- very long haul with no guarantees of success. >> i think we will have success, but i fully agree that we have to stay committed in afghanistan as long as it takes to prevail. >> an entire town in china is in quarantine. a second person has died there from mnemonic plague. the town has a population of 10,000. apart from the two dead, another 10 people are infected. the world health organization's office in beijing says it does feel chinese authorities are taking appropriate measures. in japan, the first jury trial for more than 60 years is underway as part of an overhaul of the legal system. six locals have been selected at random to work with three judges at a murder trial, to make justice more transparent and bring it closer to the public. 100,000 peel have lined the streets of manila to watch the funeral of a leader there. she led a popular uprising against the regime of marcos and became asia's first woman preside
PBS
Aug 6, 2009 5:30pm EDT
corporations. what can we do for you? >> the u.s. and dips its toe again in somalia. it is not sending soldiers this time, it says, but military support and aid. three indians convicted of the 2003 mumbai tax get the death penalty. keeping watch on on -- on call sam -- uncle sam. coming up later for you, can jumping off rocks into the sea be safe? it sure it can, says the organizer of a new coastal pursuit. mourning the passing of sam the koala. hello to the u.s. secretary of state has publicly warned eritrea that the u.s. will take action against the country if it does not stop supporting militants in somalia. hillary clinton promises to expand help for somalia's week interim governments, threatened by al qaeda-linked terrorists. she met somalia's president today in kenya. >> a mark of respect for those killed during a terror attack 11 years ago in central nairobi. the american embassy was bombed, and the victims were mostly canyons. that attack was blamed on al qaeda. the american secretary of state believes threats of terrorism remain. >> it is an opportunity to renew our resolve. we need to
PBS
Aug 10, 2009 7:00pm EDT
have already declared that the recession is over and that the u.s. economy is on the path of recovery. but as scott gurvey reports, even the experts have lots of questions about the central bank's next move. >> reporter: fed watchers would like answers to three questions when the central bank concludes its august meeting on wednesday. first, they want to know abo plans to raise interest rates. second, they want to know if the fed thinks the economic recovery is real. and finally, they want to know if chairman ben bernanke will be re-appointed to a second four- year term. well, answers to two out of three isn't bad. first up, there isn't a snowball's chance in a very warm place that the fed funds rate will be raised from its zero to .25% range this month, or, according to jim o'sullivan of u.b.s., anytime soon. >> most likely they'll repeat the language, indicating that the funds rate's going to stay exceptionally low for an extended period. in addition, we would expect the wording to be a bit more optimistic sounding on the outlook for growth. this is consistent with the idea that the
PBS
Aug 26, 2009 12:00am EDT
guilty of a huge terrorist crime received on his return to libya. >> and that brings to us tonights "lead focus." our british partner itn has been looking at britain's relationship with libya, its business interest there, leading up to last week's decision to release the lockerbie bomber. as you'll see in john sparks' report, one is left with the impression that at the very least, al megrahi's release can't hurt the relationship. >> reporter: the analysts call it real politic, doing practical deals, the art of give and take. the uk and libya have been doing this for about a decade. but how influential are commercial considerations? where does business fit in this complex mix? libya is an exciting new destination for british business. but did that excitement influence the decision to release abdel basset al megrahi, the man convicted of the lockerbie bombing. scottish and british governments say absolutely not. but al megrahi's future and new business opportunities have always been part of bilateral negotiations. 2007, colonel gadhafi's regime sought to re-enter the international community
PBS
Aug 27, 2009 5:00pm EDT
. they will be on display at the memorial. netanyahu used the occasion to refer to lessons that should be learned from the holocaust. >> it does not happen because the main civilized power of the powers of the day did not act in time to stop the arming of barbarism and armed barbarism knows now limits and has to be unarmed, disarmed in time. >> reporter: netanyahu also said that he expected chancellor merkel to take a strong stand against iran's nuclear ambitions. he said iran posed a direct threat to israel's security. merkel said germany is prepared to take a tougher line with iran if that becomes necessary. >> translator: iran has been asked to participate in negotiations. if they fail to respond to these requests, we will consider stronger sanctions in the energy sector and other appropriate sectors such as the financial sector. in fact, we will not merely consider this, we will discuss with the international community how best to implement these sanctions. >> reporter: merkel said netanyahu should show more flexibility and ott issue of settlements on palestinian land. germany has called on israel
PBS
Aug 3, 2009 2:00am EDT
bomb- making factories used by the sect. they started attacking police stations on sunday. there are reports that hundreds of people have been killed in the five days of violence. the nigerian government has been concentrating its action in borno state and the capital. that is the headquarters of the s.e.c.. there has also been unrest across other states in the north of the country. there is a long history of trouble in nigeria. last year, they attacked government property. they're growing levels of poverty, malnutrition, and resentment in the islamic north. nigeria it should be a rich country. it has huge reserves of oil in the delta. the wealth has not been dispersed around the country. it adds to the discontent that sparked the current violence. >> the leader of the group behind the violence in the north died while in police custody. police say he was killed by security forces in a shootout when he tried to escape. human-rights watched called the killing unlawful and concerning. >> it is the end of butyl -- brittle few days in nigeria. -- it has been a brutal few days i
PBS
Aug 7, 2009 5:30pm EDT
's campaign to make pakistan ungovernable. sources have said that he is killed and buried, killed in a u.s. air strike on wednesday. this is from our correspondent in as, bob -- islamabad. >> baitullah mehsud is rarely seen in public. the white house has called him "a murderous thug." >> we have clear information that so far we do not have any evidence to confirm that he is dead. there were several killed during these attacks. these are indications. >> he is accused of masterminding the assassination of former prime minister benazir bhutto, as well as dozens of other attacks. he has been linked to the bombing of the marriott hotel in islamabad which claimed more than 60 lives, and his stronghold has been a sanctuary for al-qaeda, a major concern for britain and the u.s.. but he is focused on targets here at home -- bombing pakistan because it backs the west. he declared war on his own country and people. some here have told us they do not believe he is dead. they have heard that before. others have said they feel a sense of relief and that this is good news, not just for pakistan, but also
PBS
Aug 10, 2009 12:00am EDT
. >> president bill clinton. >> killed by a u.s. missile strike. a terror offensive. and putin's show, more holiday again. welcome to this week. this week showed an emotional reunion, with the north korean president and a former president to pull it off. two journalists freed after bill clinton traveled halfway across the world to meet kim jong il. adam brooks reports on the return and the impact the episode might have on the un. >> their plane touched down at dawn. the two journalists had just been rescued from the prospect of 12 years in the korean labor camp. hannah lee, who is 4, had not seen her mother since the arrest at the border. >> we were taken to a location, and when we walked through the doors, we saw standing before us. >> it takes 10 weeks to assure the reunion. >> degree and we all saw on television is a source of happiness not only for the families, but for the entire country. >> the white house wanted this to be seen as a mission of mercy, but it might be more. it winds its way up the chain to the oval office. its nuclear weapons, missiles, and intentions, have been a worr
PBS
Aug 12, 2009 7:00pm EDT
key interest rate unchanged at zero percent and signaled that the u.s. economy is beginning to recover. as suzanne pratt reports the decision was unanimous. >> reporter: the super low interest rates americans have been enjoying are likely to stay with us for a while longer. wrapping up its policy meeting, the federal reserve left the benchmark short-term rate close to zero percent, saying economic conditions warrant it. economist steve ricchuito says the fed is not telegraphing when it will raise rates, but he has his own guess. >> our personal bet is that we won't see any real movement on rates until we get to the second or third quarter of next year, and that's contingent on the economy really finding its feet and starting to be able to move sustainably forward. >> reporter: in assessing the economy, the fed said activity is leveling out, but likely to remain weak for a time. it also acknowledged financial market conditions have improved in recent weeks. policymakers also opted to slow the pace of purchases of long- term treasuries, extending the emergency rescue program by one month
PBS
Aug 17, 2009 5:00pm EDT
teaching people how to vote. >>> meanwhile u.s. and nato troops continue to battle with the taliban. tonight, an up close look at the fighting. in fact for the british tv crew. maybe a bit too close. >>> and as washington welcomes egyptian president hosni mubarak we look at his popularity back home. after 28-years as their leader egyptians have lots to say and much of it isn't good. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here is what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in vr >> reporter: just days ahead of the elections. many residents doubt it will be safe enough to vote. but u.s. forces and the government are determined to ensure polling stations are >> it will be election here and it may be modest, but you know so far as i'm concerned if one person comes out to vote then that's enough suck jes afghan and election observers say there is enough chance elections will be freely and fair. the precarious situation means it will be impossible to have observers at every polling station. >> many americans might not realize is that afghanist
PBS
Aug 5, 2009 12:00am EDT
of the u.s. government, will open the way. i trust, to having bilateral talks, which is the key to getting somewhere with the north koreans respecting their sovereignty, their independence. it's an important signal. >> reporter: the white house says that clinton did not carry a message from president obama to the north korean leader. contrary to reporters by state media. >> this was a private mission that we weren't going to comment on. while the former president was on the ground in north korea and as a result of that, i don't have anything more to add on this at this time. >> reporter: however, the former president's visit comes in the midst of an international standoff between washington and pyongyang, over north korea's nuclear program. north korea has expressed a strong interest in one-on-one negotiations with the obama administration. but it says it won't return to the so-called six-party talks involving north korea, china, japan, south korea, russia and the u.s. >> they've gotten themselves trapped into increased isolation. that's not helpful to their -- to them ultimately. we, on t
PBS
Aug 21, 2009 12:00am EDT
"ectonight. damon green of itn has our report. >> reporter: this used to be an aircraft, and for those who boarded as passengers, there was no way out. today the man convicted of blowing a passenger jet into fragments and violently ending the lives of all 270 people on board, learned he will be free to live out his remaining days in peace. >> it is my decision that mr. abdel basset al megrahi, convicted in 2001 for the a jddq uq)minally ill with pros cancer be released on compassionate grounds and be allowed to return to libya to die. >> reporter: the destruction of pan am flight 103 remains one of the bloodiest terror attacks ever launched at the west and one which was immediately blamed on libya. at the time of the lockerbie bombing, the nation was a pariah state, internationally shunned, accused of sponsoring terrorism. its leader a figure of hate in the west. it was only after 15 years of sanctions that libya finally admitted it carried out the bombing and paid compensation to victims' families. and within a year, tony blair was visiting tripoli to show that relations were back to normal, a co
PBS
Aug 11, 2009 12:00am EDT
for months, the iraqi government and the u.s. have been sending the message that the security situation has steadily improved. american troops, 132,000 of them, are now in a support role. and in recent days the government has relaxed security in baghdad. but once again today, there was violence. a wave of it killing at least 48 people and wounding more than 250. the attacks were in a town near mosul in the north and in baghdad itself. the continuing violence and why it's happening, it's our "lead focus" tonight. we start with hoda abdel hamid of al jazeera english. >> reporter: ely morning in iraq and dozens of people are already confirmed dead in various attacks. each underscoring one of the many conflicts that still plague the country. in baghdad, officials say five bombs went off. the deadliest one targeted day laborers waiting for a job. one of the bombs was in hay al amel in the west of the capital, one of the few areas where sunnis and shias still live side by side. the bomb was hidden inside a cement bag, says this man. moments later, a second blast, further north in western baghdad,
PBS
Aug 11, 2009 5:00pm EDT
long we didn't know if anyone was coming for us." >> reporter: with the only road into hsiao lin and several other remote villages still washed out, rescue efforts have been painfully slowed. medical teams trying to get in on the ground have been forced to wait. we've been here hours now and so far escavators have made little to no progress in clearing the road. it ri mains very much a liquid rover of mud and the constant rain is making matters worse. we're not getting through this engineer tells us. it may still take days. and so the government's answer, send soldiers in by air. the first group touched down in hsiao lin to a scene of utter devastation. currently the entire village is buried says taiwan's deputy minister of defense, and we have not even started to look for the missing from neighboring villages. by late afternoon, hundreds of survivors had been airlifted out of the region. but thousands more remain unaccounted for. at a nearby high school, relatives of those missing waited to hearals. these sisters last heard from their parents saturday. they told us hsiao lin vil
PBS
Aug 12, 2009 5:30pm EDT
president. they'll be growing up in what at the very least will be a client state. >> the u.s. central bank, the federal reserve is to keep interest rates close to zero for an extended period despite signs of recovery in the u.s. economy. the ted says economic indicators since it's last meeting in late june suggest economic activity is leveling out, while conditions in financial employees have also improved. >> the american secretary of state urges nigeria to curb corruption and improve government. talks during her african tour, mrs. clinton said the u.s. would offer advice on electoral reform. >> five pakistan preachers were killed, two others wounded. the gunman walked into the mosque after morning appraiser, forced the preachers outside and opened fire. >> a massive rescue operation is still underway in taiwan amid the worst flooding in 50 years. there was a moment of relief when around 700 people were found alive. they had escaped the mud slides that have buried whole villages. there are many more unaccounted for. >> as the clouds clear, though the scale of this disaster becomes more ap
PBS
Aug 21, 2009 7:00pm EDT
, everyone. ben bernanke said today the prospects for economic growth in the u.s. appear to be "good," and those comments triggered a stock market rally. speaking at a conference in jackson hole, wyoming, the federal reserve chairman gave a more upbeat forecast compared to the fed's statement last week after a central bank policy meeting. but bernanke also warned of "critical challenges". specifically, bernanke said financial firms face "significant losses," businesses and consumers are experiencing difficulty in getting credit, the economic recovery will be "relatively slow," and he expects a gradual recovery in unemployment. bernanke defended the actions taken by the fed during the financial crisis, saying they averted an "imminent collapse" of the financial system. joining us now with more analysis, robert mcteer, former president of the federal reserve bank of dallas and currently distinguished fellow at the national center for policy analysis. nice to see you on the program again. >> thank you, susie, good to be with you. >> susie: is ben bernanke right about the economic outloo
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